Be Swedish, Think American.

 

Ray Skoglund is an investment banker at Colorado Financial Service Corporation with a specialty in mergers and acquisitions in the software and mobile technology sector. As an investment banker, Ray almost exclusively works with high-growth Swedish clients that are looking to partner with bigger technology companies here in the U.S

 

What is your connection to Sweden?

- My father was Swedish and I have been on the SACC-NE board for about 10 years. In terms of business, I enjoy working with Swedish companies because they are really at the forefront of new technology. The intellectual property coming out of Sweden, is as good, or sometimes even better than what is coming out of the United States.

Why should Swedish companies consider coming to Boston?

- Boston make sense for Swedish companies that want to open an initial sales or marketing outpost in the United States. Not only is Boston advantageous in terms of the comparatively small time zone difference, but it is also arguably the most European city in America, which makes it a good entry point into the United States.
I myself have been in Boston for about 20 years and location is ideal for working with European technology companies looking to access the United States. Being in Boston allows me to interact with Swedish companies in the morning and then interact with potential buyers, usually in California, in the afternoon.

How do I find a venture capital firm in the U.S. that want to invest in my company?

- Not many of the big tech companies in the U.S. know what is going on in Sweden, so my advice is for Swedish companies to start their acquisition outreach in the U.S. as soon as possible. And more often than not, a venture capital firm here in Boston or California will not consider investing in a company that has not made the move to the United States.

Any final advice for Swedish companies looking at the U.S.?

- I sometimes tell my clients that they should “be Swedish but think American”. There are a lot of cutting edge advances in technology coming out of Sweden right now, but it often takes an American “fire-in-the-belly” attitude in order for a good idea to turn into a growing company. So I would tell Swedish companies to be a little more aggressive and to market their products in the United States sooner rather than later.

What is your connection to Sweden?

- My father was Swedish and I have been on the SACC-NE board for about 10 years. In terms of business, I enjoy working with Swedish companies because they are really at the forefront of new technology. The intellectual property coming out of Sweden, is as good, or sometimes even better than what is coming out of the United States. 

Why should Swedish companies consider coming to Boston?

- Boston make sense for Swedish companies that want to open an initial sales or marketing outpost in the United States. Not only is Boston advantageous in terms of the comparatively small time zone difference, but it is also arguably the most European city in America, which makes it a good entry point into the United States.

I myself have been in Boston for about 20 years and location is ideal for working with European technology companies looking to access the United States.  Being in Boston allows me to interact with Swedish companies in the morning and then interact with potential buyers, usually in California, in the afternoon. 

How do I find a venture capital firm in the U.S. that want to invest in my company?

- Not many of the big tech companies in the U.S. know what is going on in Sweden, so my advice is for Swedish companies to start their acquisition outreach in the U.S. as soon as possible. And more often than not, a venture capital firm here in Boston or California will not consider investing in a company that has not made the move to the United States.

Any final advice for Swedish companies looking at the U.S.?

- I sometimes tell my clients that they should “be Swedish but think American”. There are a lot of cutting edge advances in technology coming out of Sweden right now, but it often takes an American “fire-in-the-belly” attitude in order for a good idea to turn into a growing company. So I would tell Swedish companies to be a little more aggressive and to market their products in the United States sooner rather than later.